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The Nicolaitan Dogma
An Anti-Torah Belief
By Shlomo Phillips © 09.13.1989 (last updated 08.09.2013)




The "Nicolaitan Heresy" is referenced directly in Genesis and in the Book of the Revelation and indirectly by Paul, John and others in the New Testament). It is essentially the Humanist dogma of Universalism. The essential idea goes back to the Garden of Eden if we approach it from a literalist perspective:
Is it true that God has said, You shall not eat of every tree of the garden?... You shall not surely die, for God knows that in the day you eat of it, then your eyes shall be opened, and you shall be as God, knowing good and evil -- Genesis 3:1-5.
The Nicolaitan heresy is that humans can elevate themselves to godhood through the unification of resources and beliefs. At the Tower of Babel (Genesis 10,11) humanity sought to replace the worship of the One God with Deistic Humanism (Deism: i.e. the belief there is a God but that He/She/It has departed and left us to our devises) under the guidance of Goddess Atargati of Babylon. The underpinning dogma then and now is the conviction that human consciousness can be unified through diverse religious, psychological and philosophical constructs to form a single global power structure, paradigm and awareness through which humanity can be elevated to the state of divinity In other words:
Genesis 3:5 ... your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil.
The Nicolaitan heresy proposes to replace the one true God with the Nicolaitan/Merovingians Elite. These self proclaimed 'Masters of the Universe' are among us and guiding the ever unfolding heresy.

Joshua 24:15 If it seems bad to you to serve ADONAI, then choose today whom you are going to serve! Will it be the gods your ancestors served beyond the River? or the gods of the Emori, in whose land you are living? As for me and my household, we will serve ADONAI!"

Be the Blessing you were created to be

and

Don't let the perfect defeat the good.